The Baron o Leys

No: 241; variant: 241C

  1. THE Baron o Leys to France is gane, The fashion and tongue to learn, But hadna been there a month or twa Till he gat a lady wi bairn.
  2. But it fell ance upon a day The lady mournd fu sairlie; Says, Who’s the man has me betrayed? It gars me wonder and fairlie.
  3. Then to the fields to him she went, Saying, Tell me what they ca thee; Or else I’ll mourn and rue the day, Crying, alas that ever I saw thee!
  4. ‘Some ca’s me this, some ca’s me that, I carena fat befa me; For when I’m at the schools o France An awkward fellow they ca me.’
  5. ‘Wae’s me now, ye awkward fellow, And alas that ever I saw thee! Wi you I’m in love, sick, sick in love, And I kenna well fat they ca thee.’
  6. ‘Some ca’s me this, some ca’s me that, What name does best befa me; For when I walk in Edinburgh streets The Curling Buckle they ca me.’
  7. ‘O wae’s me now, O Curling Buckle, And alas that ever I saw thee! For I’m in love, sick, sick in love, And I kenna well fat they ca thee.’
  8. ‘Some ca’s me this, some ca’s me that, Whatever name best befa’s me; But when I’m in Scotland’s king’s high court Clatter the Speens they ca me.’
  9. ‘O wae’s me now, O Clatter the Speens, And alas that ever I saw thee! For I’m in love, sick, sick in love, And I kenna well fat to ca thee.’
  10. ‘Some ca’s me this, some ca’s me that, I carena what they ca me; But when wi the Earl o Murray I ride It’s Scour the Brass they ca me.’
  11. ‘O wae’s me now, O Scour the Brass, And alas that ever I saw thee! For I’m in love, sick, sick in love, Amd I kenna well fat to ca thee.’
  12. ‘Some ca’s me this, some ca’s me that, Whatever name best befa’s me; But when I walk thro Saint Johnstone’s town George Burnett they ca me.’
  13. ‘O wae’s me, O wae’s me, George Burnett, And alas that ever I saw thee! For I’m in love, sick, sick in love, And I kenna well fat to ca thee.’
  14. ‘Some ca’s me this, some ca’s me that, Whatever name best befa’s me; But when I am on bonny Dee side The Baron o Leys they ca me.’
  15. ‘O weal is me now, O Baron o Leys, This day that ever I saw thee! There’s gentle blood within my sides, And now [I] ken fat they ca thee.
  16. ‘But ye’ll pay down ten thousand crowns, Or marry me the morn; Else I’ll cause you be headed or hangd For gieing me the scorn.’
  17. ‘My head is a thing I cannot well want; My lady loves me sae dearly; But I’ll deal the gold right liberally For lying ae night sae near thee.’
  18. When word had gane to the Lady o Leys The baron had gotten a bairn, She clapped her hands, and this did say, ‘I wish he were in my arms!
  19. ‘O weal is me now, O Baron o Leys, For ye hae pleased me sairly; Frae our house is banishd the vile reproach That disturbed us late and early.’
  20. When she looked ower her castle-wa, To view the woods sae rarely, There she spied the Baron o Leys Ride on his steed sae rarely.
  21. Then forth she went her baron to meet, Says, Ye’re welcome to me, fairly! Ye’se hae spice-cakes, and seed-cakes sweet, And claret to drink sae rarely.