Richie Story

No: 232; variant: 232E

  1. THE Earl of Wigton has seven sisters, And O but they be wondrous bonnie! And the bonniest lass amang them a’ Has fallen in love wi Richie Storie.
  2. As I came down by yon river-side, And down by the banks of Eache bonnie, There I met my own true-love, Wi ribbons on her shoulders bonnie.
  3. ‘Here is a letter for you, madam, Here is a letter for you, madam; The earl of Aboyne has a noble design To be a suitor to you, madam.’
  4. ‘I’ll hae nane of his letters, Richie, I’ll hae nane of his letters, Richie, For I’ve made a vow, and I’ll keep it true, That I’ll hae nane but you, Richie.’
  5. ‘Take your word again, madam, Take your word again, madam, For I have neither land nor rents For to mentain you on, madam.’
  6. ‘I’ll sit below the dyke, Richie, I’ll sit below the dyke, Richie, And I will be at your command At ony time you like, Richie.
  7. ‘Ribbons you shall wear, Richie, Ribbons you shall wear, Richie, A cambric band about your neck, And vow but ye’ll be braw, Richie!’
  8. As they came in by the West Port, The naps of gold were bobbing bonnie; Many a one bade this lady gude-day, But neer a one to Richie Storie.
  9. As they came up the Parliament Close, Naps of gold were bobbing bonnie; Many a gentleman lifted his cap, But few kennd she was Richie’s lady.
  10. . . . . . . . . And ay methinks we’ll drink the night In Cambernauld sae bonnie.
  11. ‘It’s are not you sick, sister, Are not you very sorrie, To leave the lands of bonnie Cambernauld, And run awae wi Richie Storie?’
  12. ‘Why should I be sick, sister, O why should I be any sorrie, When I hae gotten my heart’s delight? I hae gotten the lot was laid afore me.’