The Knight and the Shepherd’s Daughter

No: 110; variant: 110[M]

  1. There was a shepherd’s daughter Kept hogs upo yon hill, By cam her a gentle knight, And he would hae his will.
  2. Whan his will o her he had, [His will] as he had taen, ‘Kind sir, for yer courtesy, Will ye tell me yer name?’
  3. ‘Some they ca me Jock,’ he says, ‘And some they ca me John; But whan ‘m in our king’s court Hitchcock is my name.’
  4. They lady being well book-read She spelt it oer again: ‘Hitchcock in our king’s court Is Earl Richard at hame.’
  5. He pat his leg out-oer his steed And to the get he’s gane; She keltit up her green clothing, And fast, fast followed him.
  6. ‘Turn back, turn back, ye carl’s daughter, And dinna follow me; It sets na carl’s daughters Kings’ courts for to see.’
  7. ‘Perhaps I am a cerl’s daughter, Perhaps I am nane, But whan ye gat me in free forest Ye might ha latten’s alane.’
  8. Whan they cam to yon wan water That a’ man does call Clyde, He looket oer his left shuder, Says, Fair may, will ye ride?
  9. ‘I learnt it in my mother’s bowr, I wis I had learnt it better, Whan I cam to wan water To soom as does the otter.’
  10. Or the knight was i the middle o the water, The lady she was oer; She took out a came o gold, To came down her yellow hair.
  11. ‘Whar gat ye that, ye cerl’s daughter? I pray ye tell to me:’ ‘I got it fra my mither,’ she says, ‘To beguil sick chaps as thee.’
  12. Whan they cam to our king’s court, He rade it round about, And he gade in at a shot-window, And left the lady without.
  13. She gade to our king hersel, She fell low down upon her knee: ‘There is a knight into your court This day has robbed me.’
  14. ‘Has he robbd ye o your goud? Or o yer well-won fee? Or o yer maidenhead, The flower o yer body?’
  15. ‘He has na robbd me o my goud, For I ha nane to gee; But he has robbd me o my maidenhead, The flower o my body.’
  16. ‘O wud ye ken the knight,’ he says, ‘If that ye did him see?’ ‘I wud him ken by his well-fared face And the blyth blink o his ee.’
  17. ‘An he be a married man, High hanged sall he be, And an he be a free man, Well wedded to him ye’s be, Altho it be my brother Richie, And I wiss it be no he.’
  18. The king called on his merry young men, By ane, by twa, by three; Earl Richmond had used to be the first, But the hindmost was he.
  19. By that ye mith ha well kent That the quilty man was he; She took him by the milk-white hand, Says, This same ane is he.
  20. There was a brand laid down to her, A brand but an a ring, Three times she minted to the brand, But she took up the ring; A’ that was in our king’s court Countet her a wise woman.
  21. ‘I’ll gi ye five hundred pounds, To mak yer marriage we, An ye’l turn back, ye cerl’s daughter, And fash nae mere wi me.’
  22. ‘Gae keep yer five hundred pounds To mak yer merriage we, For I’ll hae nathing but yersel The king he promised me.’
  23. ‘I’ll gae ye one thousand pounds To mak yer marriage we, An ye’l turn back, ye cerl’s daughter, And fash nae mere wi me.’
  24. ‘Gae keep yer one thousand pounds, To mak yer merriage we, For I’ll hae nathing but yersel The king he promised me.’
  25. He took her down to yon garden, And clothed her in the green; Whan she cam up again, Sh[e] was fairer than the queen.
  26. They gad on to Mary kirk, and on to Mary quire, The nettles they grew by the dyke: ‘O, an my mither wer her[e], So clean as she wud them pick!’
  27. ‘I wiss I had druken water,’ he says, ‘Whan I drank the ale, That ony cerl’s daughter Sud tell me sick a tale.’
  28. ‘Perhaps I am a cerl’s daughter, Perhaps I am nane; But whan ye gat me in free forest Ye might ha latten’s alane.
  29. ‘Well mat this mill be, And well mat the gae! Mony a day they ha filled me pock O the white meal and the gray.’
  30. ‘I wiss I had druken water,’ he says, ‘When I drank the ale, That ony cerl’s daughter Sud tell me sick a tale.’
  31. ‘Perhaps I am a cerl’s daughter, Perhaps I am nane; But whan ye gat me in free forest Ye might ha latten’s alane.
  32. ‘Tak awa yer siller spoons, Tak awa fra me, An gae me the gude horn spoons, It’s what I’m used tee.
  33. ‘O an my mukle dish wer here, And sine we hit were fu, I wud sup file I am saerd, An sine lay down me head and sleep wi ony sow.’
  34. ‘I wiss I had druken water,’ he says, ‘Whan I drank the ale, That any cerl’s daughter Sud tell me sick a tale.’
  35. ‘Perhaps I am a cerl’s daughter, Perhaps I am nane, But whan ye gat me in free forest, Ye might ha latten’s alane.’
  36. He took his hat in oer his face, The tear blindit his ee; She threw back her yellow locks, And a light laughter leugh she.
  37. ‘Bot an ye be a beggar geet, As I trust well ye be, Whar gat ye their fine clothing Yer body was covered we?’
  38. ‘My mother was an ill woman, And an ill woman was she; She gat them . . . . Fra sic chaps as thee.’
  39. Whan bells were rung, and mess was sung, And aa man bound to bed, Earl Richard and the carl’s daughter In a chamer were laid.
  40. ‘Lie yont, lie yont, ye carl’s daughter, Yer hot skin burns me; It sets na carl’s daughters In earls’ beds to be.’
  41. ‘Perhaps I am a carl’s daughter, Perhaps I am nane; But whan ye gat me in free forest Ye might ha latten’s alane.’
  42. Up it starts the Belly Blin, Just at their bed-feet.
  43. ‘I think it is a meet marrige Atween the taen and the tither, The Earl of Hertford’s ae daughter And the Queen of England’s brither.’
  44. ‘An this be the Earl of Hertford’s ae daughter, As I trust well it be, Mony a gude horse ha I ridden For the love o thee.’